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mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!
mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!
mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!
mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!
mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!
mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters
By Lorraine Hamilton
Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.
As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  
While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  
Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.
The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.
“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”
“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 
Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.
“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”
Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.
“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”
Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  
In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        30                           WOR     15
In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        200                         WOR     235
In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
SNY        260                         WOR     255  
The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.
Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.
INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC
FINAL SCORE
SNY        650                         WOR 555
When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  
“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.
Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.
“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 
“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  
With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!

mets:

Battle of the Broadcasters

By Lorraine Hamilton

Since the inception of the Mets in 1962, the organization’s broadcast team has always been exemplary.   It all began with Ralph Kiner, Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson, an iconic trio not only in the chronicles of Mets’ history, but of baseball’s lore. Back in those days, the broadcasters did both radio and television. Today, the duties are split and the tradition of excellence continues.

As both of the Mets radio and TV booths are equally lauded by critics and fans, the productions team at SNY thought it would be entertaining and good fun to pit the two teams against each other in the “Battle of the Broadcasters.” The guys were tested on Mets history, trivia, memory and recall speed.  

While both teams are equally matched in knowledge, the pressure of the ticking clock and the adrenaline that comes along with competition changes the dynamics. The idea for the game show came from Gary Morgenstern and Russell Fink of SNY’s programming department.  

Howie Rose was the leader of the WOR radio team.  Rose, known for his famous catchphrase “Put it in the books!” that punctuates each Mets victory, has been a Mets broadcaster since 1994. He grew up in Queens and became a voracious Mets fan and student of the game, which evolved into his lifetime passion and career.  Josh Lewin joined Howie in the booth in 2012 and the pair gelled quickly and has been embraced by fans. Seth Everett is in his freshman season as the pre- and post-game host and needed to do some serious cramming to get up to speed.

The SNY broadcast team of Gary Cohen, Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez has been together since the launch of the network in 2006. Cohen, just like Rose, grew up an ardent Met fan and is widely regarded as an expert on team history and trivia. Of course, Darling and Hernandez both having played for the team, share a wealth of knowledge, but also have the competitive edge that comes with being a former professional athlete.  Kevin Burkhardt, SNY’s in-game reporter since 2007, acted as the game-show host.

“We were tasked with the challenge of producing a game show, which no one from our group ever had any experience with”, said Marc Davis the show’s producer. “Tom Healey, our director did a ton of research and came up with the set design and show format.”

“We knew right away that we wanted Kevin to use a long stem microphone reminiscent of  the one that Bob Barker’s used on the Price is Right,” Healy said. “We asked Kevin to wear his least conservative suit and ham it up.” 

Backstage in the green room, the tension began to mount as the teams prepared for the face-off.

“It was a nerve-wracking experience,” the normally unflappable Cohen said. “It’s one thing to know the answers. It’s quite another to be able to produce them on demand under hot lights, with the world watching and Howie on the other team.”

Rose, who for weeks leading up to the taping joked on air that the fix was in for the SNY team, was anxious waiting to lock brains with Cohen.

“There was definitely a sense of anticipation about the competition, but as soon as Kevin Burkhardt trotted out as a hokey 70’s game show host, I knew it was going to be fun,” Rose said. “Gary and I are very much kindred spirits and our backgrounds make a perfect match for a game like this.”

Soon after the SNY and WOR teams took their places, Kevin Burkhardt burst onto the set bringing a combination of Bob Barker’s, Dick Clark’s, Richard Dawson’s and Alex Trebek’s energy and expertise to his role as host.  

In round one, aptly named Terrific Trivia, the contestants had a minute and thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible. Five points were awarded for each correct answer, with no deductions for an incorrect answer. SNY came on strong and dominated with what Rose later referred to as “the home field advantage.”

INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC

SNY        30                           WOR     15

In round two, called Three Strikes and You’re Out, teams were given one minute or three incorrect answers, whichever came first. Passing and a wrong answer counted as a strike. Each team received two questions and each correct answer was worth 10 points. WOR had a strong showing, naming Mets hitters with 20 home run seasons and pitchers who had earned at least 10 saves in a season since 1969. Their 22 correct answers netted them 220 points. SNY didn’t fare as well, struggling to recall previous Mets Opening Day starting pitchers and members of the 2000 National League Championship roster for 17 correct answers and 170 points.  “We have a game now”, Burkhardt proclaimed.

INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC

SNY        200                         WOR     235

In round three titled Shea What, players had to buzz in Jeopardy-style.  They then had six seconds to come up with the right answer or lose 20 points for their team. Each correct answer was worth 20 points. Cohen and Darling ran the board in the segment. “The TV guys are en fuego,” said Kevin, showing off his Spanish to his already over-the-top game show act.  After the hot start, a few mistakes brought them back down to reality and closer to an even playing ground going into the bottom of the ninth.

INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC

SNY        260                         WOR     255 

The “Ya Gotta Believe” round four was modelled after the $10,000 Pyramid Game. Each team had a minute and half and and received 30 points for each correct answer.  SNY was up first with Cohen giving clues to Darling and Hernandez.  Going into the round, Darling said, “I’m a little nervous now,” and Cohen added, “As we know, the ninth inning is a little different.”  True to his style, Cohen rose to the occasion giving his broadcast partners perfect clues. Darling was completely tuned in and firing back correctly with Keith coming alive as the clock ticked down.

Up next, Rose provided clues to Lewin and Everett.  Burkhardt, let team WOR know that they needed 14 correct answers to win the game. Lewin yelled, “Gil Hodges was #14, does that count?” Rose felt it was unfair that one of SNY’s questions was asking Darling and Hernandez to name the team’s pitching coach in 1986. “Josh didn’t have a pitching coach, Seth didn’t have a pitching coach. You might as well be asking them their father’s names,”  Rose said. The questions were indeed fair though, as they were all prepared by Ken and Steve Hirdt of the Elias Sports Bureau.  Although the WOR team gave it their all, Rose, Lewin and Everett came up a little short, getting 10 correct answers.

INSERT SCORECARD GRAPHIC

FINAL SCORE

SNY        650                         WOR 555

When the game was over, colored confetti flew from the ceiling. In the end, a good time was had by all.  

“It was a tight contest between the WOR Mets broadcasters and the SNY crew, but it was full of laughs, and most importantly, it benefits a worthy cause”, said Tom Cuddy, WOR’s Programming Director.

Mr. Met was part of the trophy presentation to SNY.

“He’s guarding that trophy more closely than they guard the Stanley Cup,” said Cohen . “I’m speechless and a little breathless. This is a great honor.” 

“We should bring this trophy with us on the road,” Darling joked.  

With that, both teams departed for Citi Field to get back to their real jobs!

iquantny:

We’ve all been there. The train is coming into the station, and you grab your MetroCard and quickly try and swipe it at a turnstile.

"Please Swipe Again". "Please Swipe Again". "Insufficient Fare".

The last two words are killer. You think to yourself “I swear I had a balance on this card”….

When I’m tracking my delivery guy online and he suddenly starts driving in the wrong direction


On this day, 33 years ago, the woman we’ve all come to respect was born and graced the earth with her angelic voice. Happy Birthday to Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter. 

On this day, 33 years ago, the woman we’ve all come to respect was born and graced the earth with her angelic voice. Happy Birthday to Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter. 

(via beyoncegifs)

thedogist:

Lil Gus, French Bulldog, Holly & Lil Handmade Collars, London, UK

aboutdotcom:

Here is the big story, and we are incredibly excited to share it with you – today we are rolling out the new About.com, our first new site in nearly a decade. It has been a year long labor of love, and we are thrilled to share it with you. We hope you like it as much as we do.

At About.com,…